Breastfeeding: Challenging Paradigms

Breastfeeding: Challenging Paradigms

March 6th - June 6th 2024

1 hr

Trauma and breastfeeding 

Trauma affects at least one-third of childbearing women. This presentation will provide an overview of the types of trauma women are most likely to experience and provide strategies for working effectively and comfortably with trauma survivors. Dr Kendall- Tackett also provides an overview of research showing that breastfeeding helps trauma survivors cope and lessens the risk of intergenerational trauma.

1 L Cerp (II, V, VI, VII)

  • II Physiology & Endocrinology
  • V Psychology, Sociology & Anthropology
  • VI Techniques
  • VII Clinical Skills
Trauma and breastfeeding - Kathleen Kendall-Tackett
1 hr

In this presentation, Associate Professor Wendy Ingman will cover:

The evolution of lactation

  • Indispensable for survival of over 5000 mammalian species
  • Composition of milk provides nourishment to the newborn
  • Milk protects newborns from disease by passive transfer of immunity
  • Lactation strategy matches reproductive strategy of mammal

The biology of the breast over the life course - Menstrual cycle - Pregnancy - Lactation - Involution

Why breastfeeding reduces breast cancer risk

Mastitis and lactation insufficiency (new research challenging old paradigms)

1 L Cerp (I, II, III, V) 

  • I Development & Nutrition
  • II Physiology & Endocrinology
  • III Pathology
  • V Psychology, Sociology & Anthropology
Understanding the biology of lactation: Challenging old paradigms to improve breastfeeding outcomes - Wendy Ingman
1 hr

In this presentation, Jan Tedder will explore the topic of nursing strikes, looking at the differing reasons for this and predictable times when development may impact a baby’s behaviour and mother’s breastfeeding experience. She will review these developmental events throughout the first year.

Objectives

  • Describe how to differentiate weaning from a nursing strike.
  • List three changes in a baby’s family, or in her development, that might trigger a nursing strike.
  • List three temperament characteristics that might increase the likelihood of a baby’s having a nursing strike.

1 L Cerp (I, V, VI, VII) 

  • I Development & Nutrition
  • V Psychology, Sociology & Anthropology
  • VI Techniques
  • VII Clinical Skills
Nursing strikes: Child development, child temperament and breastfeeding - Jan Tedder
5 mins
Evaluation survey

Jan Tedder
BIOGRAPHY

Jan Tedder

BSN, FNP, IBCLC

Jan Tedder is from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (USA) where she works as a nurse practitioner and lactation consultant and teaches family physician residents.  A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and at Charlotte, Ms. Tedder has worked with young families in primary care for decades. She has developed lactation and well child programs, created parent education outreach projects, and consulted with both parents and professionals on critical lactation and child development issues. Ms. Tedder created HUG Your Baby, winner of the National Health Information Award and the World Wide Web Health Award. HUG Your Baby’s website, blog and parent education resources are now used in over 100 countries around the world.  She has published HUG research and program descriptions in peer-reviewed journals, lectured internationally on issues related to infants and families, and created well-received online training for midwives, nurses, childbirth educators, lactation specialists, and doulas. Ms. Tedder was inducted into the International Sigma Theta Tau Honor Society of Nursing and was chosen as the North Carolina (USA) Maternal-Child Health Nurse of the Year. 

 

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett
BIOGRAPHY

Kathleen Kendall-Tackett

PhD, IBCLC, FAPA

Dr Kendall-Tackett specializes in women’s-health research including breastfeeding, depression, trauma, and health psychology. She is a health psychologist, IBCLC, and the owner and editor-in-chief of Praeclarus Press. She is editor-in-chief of two peer-reviewed journals: Clinical Lactation and Psychological Trauma. She is fellow of the American Psychological Association in Health and Trauma Psychology, past president of the APA Division of Trauma Psychology, and a member of the Board for the Advancement of Psychology in the Public Interest. She has authored more than 400 articles or chapters, her most recent books include: Depression in New Mothers, Women’s Mental Health Across the Lifespan, Psychology of Trauma 101 and The Science of Mother-Infant Sleep.

 

Wendy Ingman
BIOGRAPHY

Wendy Ingman

PhD, BSc (Honours)

Associate Professor Wendy Ingman is a Breast Biologist at the University of Adelaide, based at The Queen Elizabeth Hospital. Her research dissects the biology of how the breast develops and functions to better understand how disease states occur, including lactation mastitis and breast cancer. After postdoctoral research as an NHMRC CJ Martin Fellow at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, USA, Wendy returned to Adelaide in 2005 and established the Breast Biology and Cancer Unit at the University of Adelaide. In 2011 she was appointed a National Breast Cancer Foundation Fellow and also The Hospital Research Foundation Associate Professor of Breast Cancer Research, which is her current appointment.